Tuesday, 11. September 2007
Cosmographica - The Paintings of Don Dixon

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A scene far more common within a globular cluster, where stars swarm like bees and collisions between them are more likely, this digital painting shows the final minutes of our sun's life as a white dwarf approaches it. As tidal forces stretch the sun into a pear-shape, the delicate balance between gravity and radiation pressure fails, and the sun ruptures. The energy released as the two stars merge would vaporize the earth.

Don Dixon Portfolio:
More than 500 images.
Each page contains 50 fast-loading thumbnails which link to larger images. For the sake of completeness (and to perhaps inspire young artists to persevere) I've included very early work dating from the late 1960's.


Most were created in traditional media -- acrylics on illustration board. In the past few years, however, I've done most work using Adobe Photoshop as a digital paintbox. Digital painting is wonderfully liberating. The ability to save multiple versions of a subject encourages the artist to take risks. The tradeoff, however, is that there is no physical original. On the other hand, digital images can, theoretically, last forever. The ill-fated Russian Mars 6 probe carried a CD filled with Martian literature and imagery -- including my painting Red Mars -- that was to serve as a kind of time capsule for future colonists. Unfortunately it "sleeps with the fishes" at the bottom of the Pacific instead.
Now that most of my scientific illustrations are being created digitally, I have returned to my first love: painting in oils on canvas.

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Cosmographica - The Paintings of Don Dixon
Category: Art & Visions | Astrology & Astronomy |


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